Posts Tagged ‘artist’

Patrick Lopez: Artist Extraordinaire

April 13, 2012


Patrick Lopez and his little pal Nappy are pictured here on a flight of fancy. Lopez reaches far and deep, wide and high for his artistic ideas. Then he brings them home to earth for our enjoyment. And now Patrick Lopez has signed on as another volunteer to the Early Houston Baseball History Project at SABR, and he is busy bringing new visual life to the 19th century scene that escaped the more limited coverage of photography in that era. Houston history will be the eternal landslide beneficiary of Patrick Lopez's talented generosity.

When architectural artist Patrick Lopez signed on to work up some visual renderings of Houston baseball in the 19th century for our current Early Houston Baseball Research Project, the world of our considerable effort virtually tilted on its axis to un expected new perspective on the way things here.

Discovered and recruited by our project’s stalwart knight of all local history, Mike Vance, Patrick Lopez was able to start working immediately from news accounts of the original professional base ball park at Travis and McGowen, the venue known variously as the Houston Base Ball Park, League Park, and the Travis Street Park, to sketch out in water colors how it must have appeared in its days of glory.

These are magnificent, but you will have to wait to see these down the line in conjunction with the publication. We had hoped to reach print by 2013, but that may now extend to 2014, or even 2015, due to the loss of certain researchers and writers to reasons of ill health, family matters, or the universal what-have-you blues.

The key phrase here is: God willing, we will get there – and through the commitment of those who are on board and willing to get it done in the first class way that is our only acceptable standard. When you write for history, nothing is more important than getting your coverage right and grounded as closely as possible to primary referential sources.

Right behind accuracy is the quality of our discoveries and their importance as connecting, dots on the bath of local baseball history – and in our case, from 1861 to 1961. The cream of the crop among our remaining staff of twelve workers  is responsible for now moving everything forward.

And finally, our goal is to produce a job of writing and visualization that is first rate as both an educational and entertaining work, the kind you don’t put down until you finish and hand it to your own children so that they may read it and someday hand it to their kids. With dedicated researchers like Mike Vance, internationally respected writers like Mickey Herskowitz, and fine artists like Patrick Lopez painting important pictures, this book will be our SABR legacy to the Houston ages – an essential treatment of Houston’s history that will either get done now or be lost forever, The help of us less well known contributors, but Houstonians all, also kicks into the mix. We are all in.

And we do intend to get it done. Getting lost or bailing out among our surviving volunteer workers is unacceptable.

Patrick Lopez and I share the St. Thomas High School background, but never met while were there. Patrick graduated in 1955 and I finished the following year with the Class of 1956. Funny how that works. I remember seeing Patrick in the halls and lunch in the cafeteria, but it took us over  a half century to meet and discover much we have in common.

I am totally blown away by Patrick Lopez’s architectural portfolio. You can tell that he had some exposure to comic books and Buck Rogers stuff as a kid. Get a load at this Lopez sketch of a Houston building that never got built. – It’s incredible. I like it even better than the one now going up as our replacement for the World Trade Center towers in New York.


A Patrick Lopez Rendering - the same design referred to in the previous paragraph. How could someone not put it up - somewhere? In my book of the visual, it's world class. - excerpted from "Antique Shops & Designers."

If you can get your hands on a copy of a special high end glossy trade publication called “Antique Shops & Designers,” check out the story on page 52 called “Back to the Future Patrick Lopez” by Nancy Ehrenkranz. It’s a superb story of Lopez’s life work. As Ehrenkranz reports, Patrick Lopez was honored for the body of his work in 2011 by Architecture Center Houston – and that’s high honor folks, one that only goes to the most deserving members of that field.

Thanks for helping to make our “baseball club” a “winning team,” Patrick Lopez. – When it comes to this kind of visualization, nobody does it better.

 

Michael Hogue’s Portrait of Jackie Robinson

October 12, 2011

All good things come to some kind of end. Today’s Michael Hogue Portrait of Jackie Robinson only ends in the sense that it runs the table here on all the figures originally featured in his look at stars of the Negro Leagues in an earlier united presentation in The Dallas Morning News. For the past several weeks, those same stars have been shown here in The Pecan Park Eagle by written permission from Michael Hogue.

Today’s final portrait in this series appropriately features a look at the first man from the Negro Leagues to break the 20th century color line in the big leagues back in 1947, the one and only Jackie Robinson. Robinson broke into the major with the 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers. He played ten years with Brooklyn, batting .311 overall, and helping to lead the Dodgers to seven pennants and their only Brooklyn-based World Series title in 1955.

Jackie Robinson is our “Offering # 14″ and the last feature in this series on this fine Texas artist’s work, Portraits of the Negro Leagues. It has been nothing less than a beautiful trip. – Thank you one more time, Michael Hogue, for allowing The Pecan Park Eagle to further share the beauty and joy of your work with those readers who care about the Negro Leagues and their place in baseball history.

For more on Michael Hogue’s work, check out his website:

http://www.michaelhogue.com

Jackie Robinson, Infielder, Negro Leagues, 1945, Major Leagues, 1947-1956, Baseball Hall of Fame, 1962, Robinson's uniform #42 was retired in honor of his place as the man who broke the color line in 20th century organized baseball.

 

Jackie Robinson by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News.

“The man who broke the color line in modern baseball began his career in the Negro Leagues.

“Before playing the 1945 season with the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson was a four-sport star at UCLA, were he excelled in baseball, basketball, track and field, and football.

“Baseball was considered to be his worst sport.”

 

Michael Hogue’s Portrait of Willie Mays

October 10, 2011

The following art and text by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News is reproduced here in The Pecan Park Eagle by written permission from Michael Hogue. Today’s next to final portrait in this series features a look at Willie Mays, the “Say-Hey” kid and arguably greatest center fielder in the history of all baseball, black, white, or whatever. Willie Mays will always be remembered as a Giant, regardless of his final fumbling season as a Met. From New York to San Francisco, he was the A&P oceanic answer to “who was the last and first great man in either central pasture to play this game as a Giant on both of our east-west coasts?” Willie Mays hit 660 career home runs as a major leaguer.

Willie Mays is our “Offering # 13″ in this series and a continuation of this fine Texas artist’s work, Portraits of the Negro Leagues. Today’s subject will leave us with one old Negro Leagues subject to go after today and you may even be able to figure out in advance who that Wednesday, October 12th, subject is going to be. He was a significant gate-crosser from the world of black baseball and into the formerly all white game of so-called organized baseball. – Thank you again, Michael, and for the umpteen hundredth time, for allowing The Pecan Park Eagle to further share the beauty and joy of your work with those readers who care about the Negro Leagues and their place in baseball history.

For more on Michael Hogue’s work, check out his website:

http://www.michaelhogue.com

Willie Mays, Outfielder, Negro Leagues, 1948-49, Major League Baseball, 1951-1973, Baseball Hall of Fame, 1979.

 

Willie Mays by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News

“(Willie) Mays broke into the (Negro Leagues) ranks at age 16 with (the) Birmingham (Black Barons). He played only on Sundays during the school year. After two seasons, he signed with the majors’ New York Giants.”

 

 

Michael Hogue’s Portrait of Pop Lloyd

October 6, 2011

The following art and text by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News is reproduced here in The Pecan Park Eagle by written permission from Michael Hogue. Today’s portrait features a look at Martin Dihigo, the arguably greatest player of versatility in the history of baseball at every level.

John Henry “Pop” Lloyd is our “Offering # 11″ in this series and a continuation of this fine Texas artist’s work, Portraits of the Negro Leagues. Today’s subject, Pop Lloyd, was widely regarded as the greatest Negro Leagues player in the first two decades of the 20th century. Thank you again, Michael, for allowing The Pecan Park Eagle to further share the beauty and joy of your work with those readers who care about the Negro Leagues and their place in baseball history.

For more on Michael Hogue’s work, check out his website:

http://www.michaelhogue.com

John Henry "Pop" Lloyd, Shortstop. Negro Leagues, 1906-1932, Baseball Hall of Fame, 1977.

Pop Lloyd by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News

“Asked to name the world’s greatest player, a St. Louis sports writer in 1938 replied that in the majors it was Babe Ruth, but in all of baseball it was Lloyd.

“Ruth agreed. He voted Pop Lloyd the greatest player of all time.

“Lloyd, a superb shortstop often compared to Honus Wagner, hit .368 over 27 seasons in black baseball. He was considered the best black player in the first two decades of the 20th century.”

Michael Hogue’s Portrait of Willie Wells

September 23, 2011

The following art and text by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News is reproduced here in The Pecan Park Eagle by written permission from Michael Hogue. Today’s portrait features one more look at another Texan, shortstop Willie Wells. It is our “Offering 4″ in this series and a continuation of this fine Texas artist’s work, Portraits of the Negro Leagues. Thank you again, Michael, for allowing TPPE to further share the beauty and joy of your work with those who care about the Negro Leagues and their place in baseball history.

For more on Michael Hogue’s work, check out his website:

http://www.michaelhogue.com

 

Willie "Devil" Wells, Shortstop, Negro Leagues, 1924-1948, Hall of Fame 1997.

Willie “Devil” Wells by Michael Hogue of The Dallas Morning News.

“Wells, a native of Austin, combined superior batting skills, slick fielding and speed on the bases to become an eight-time All-Star in the Negro Leagues. A power-hitting shortstop with sure hands, he ranks among the all-time Negro League leaders in doubles, triple, home runs and stolen bases. He recorded a lifetime .392 batting average against major leaguers in exhibition games.

“He is also credited with being the first player to wear a batting helmet. One day after being knocked unconscious by a bean ball, the story goes, Wells borrowed a hard hat before a game and wore it to the plate.”


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