Luke Easter’s 1st HR: 05-06-1950

April 20, 2014
Luke Easter

Luke Easter

Luke Easter was a 6’4″ powerful looking left-handed batter who threw right as a first baseman and right fielder for the Cleveland Indians for six years from 1949 to 1954. Because of his older age when Jackie Robinson broke the color line in 1947, Easter was 33 when he moved over from the Negro League circuit for a relatively short big league career.

Easter ended up with 93 career HR in the majors, but it was a slow start. Not until his second season and his 29th active playing game did he finally bang his first homer in the bigs. And it happened on a Tuesday in Yankee Stadium, May 6, 1950, in the first game of a doubleheader for the Indians against pitcher Allie Reynolds of the Yankees. Easter came up in the 3rd inning, with two runners on and two out, and broke a scoreless tie with his first blast, a HR into the right field bleachers and a 3-0 lead. It was a big blow in the case for Cleveland victory. The Tribe went on to win the game, 5-4.

After the long initial power outage, it didn’t take Luke Easter long to find he bead on his second power shot. His first inning home run off Yankee second-game starter Fred Sanford with one on gave the Indians a short-lived 2-0 lead that the would soon relinquish on their way to losing Game Two by 7-4,

Here’s how Easter’s  first home run was handled by one national report:

________________________________________

HENRICH’S BAT GAINS YANKS SPLIT IN TWO TILTS WITH INDIANS

Luke Easter Homers Twice for Cleveland

New York, May 6.  (AP) - Big Luke Easter smashed two home runs – his first ones in major league competition – as the Cleveland Indians divided a doubleheader with the New York Yankees today. The Tribe took the opener, 5-4, but lost the nightcap, 7-4. Easter’s first blast, a terrific line drive off loser Allie Reynolds came in the third inning with two men on. with two men on . It gave Cleveland a 3 to 1 lead which it never lost. (Correction: The score was 3-0 on Easter’s HR. It only became 3-1 when the Yankees scored a single run in the bottom of the same third inning.) (Early) Wynn was credited with the victory.

Tommy Heinrich’s two doubles and two-run homer paced New York’s 11-hit attack off five Cleveland hurlers in the second game. Easter’s second homer had given the Indians a 2-0 edge in the first inning. But the Yanks came back with a pair in their half, one counting on Cliff Mapes’ homer. Fred Sanford, relieved by Joe Page in the seventh, chalked up his first victory. Sam Zoldak suffered his initial setback.

Joe DiMaggio went hitless in eight tries and now has only one safe blow to show for his last 14 efforts.

~ Associated Press, Portland (ME) Press Herald, May 7, 1950, Page 29.

________________________________________

Baseball Almanac Box Scores:

Cleveland Indians 5, New York Yankees 4

Cleveland Indians ab   r   h rbi
Mitchell lf 5 0 0 0
Vernon 1b 4 1 0 0
Easter rf 3 2 2 3
  Kennedy rf 0 0 0 0
Doby cf 3 0 1 1
Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0
Boudreau ss 4 0 0 0
Rosen 3b 3 1 1 0
Hegan c 4 1 3 0
Wynn p 2 0 1 0
  Flores p 1 0 0 0
  Lemon p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 5 8 4
New York Yankees ab   r   h rbi
Rizzuto ss 5 1 2 2
Brown 3b 5 0 2 1
  Stirnweiss pr 0 0 0 0
Henrich 1b 3 0 1 1
DiMaggio cf 4 0 0 0
Berra c 4 0 0 0
Woodling lf 2 1 0 0
Mapes rf 3 1 1 0
Coleman 2b 2 1 2 0
  Collins ph 1 0 0 0
Reynolds p 2 0 1 0
  Mize ph 1 0 0 0
  Pillette p 0 0 0 0
  Delsing ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 9 4
Cleveland 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 8 1
New York 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 4 9 0
  Cleveland Indians IP H R ER BB SO
Wynn  W(1-1) 7.0 6 2 2 4 3
  Flores 1.2 3 2 2 2 0
  Lemon  SV(1) 0.1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
9.0
9
4
4
6
3
  New York Yankees IP H R ER BB SO
Reynolds  L(1-1) 7.0 8 5 5 4 2
  Pillette 2.0 0 0 0 0 2
Totals
9.0
8
5
5
4
4

E–Gordon (3).  DP–Cleveland 3. Rosen-Gordon-Vernon, Hegan-Gordon, Gordon-Boudreau-Vernon.  2B–Cleveland Easter (2,off Reynolds); Rosen (1,off Reynolds), New York Reynolds (1,off Wynn); Coleman (5,off Wynn).  HR–Cleveland Easter (1,3rd inning off Reynolds 2 on 2 out).  SH–Wynn (1,off Reynolds).  Team LOB–6.  Team–8.  U–Johnny Stevens, Bill Summers, Bill Grieve.

Baseball Almanac Box Score | Printer Friendly Box Scores

 

Luke Easter is an easy guy to remember on a day like today. Including 21 days from the previous year, It took him 29 days to find his first egg, but he picked up the slack from there, finishing the 1950 season with  28 HR.

 

 

You can't get the rest until you bag the first one.

YOU CAN’T BAG THE REST – UNTIL YOU FIND THE FIRST ONE.

 

 

 

Larry Miggins’ 1st HR: 05-13-1952

April 19, 2014
Larry Miggins

Larry Miggins

Former Houston Buff (1949, 1951, 1953-54) and St. Louis Cardinal (1948-1952) outfielder Larry Miggins only played the final game of the 1948 season and 2 additional games in 1952 as his MLB career, but there was something special about the first of his two big league homers that never made it to print.  This brief account by Associated Press sports writer Joe Reichler that appeared in several dailies around the country of May 14, 1952, serves as an example of the ho-hum treatment that Larry got from the media in an apparent spring hailstorm of major league long ball action:

“Warning to all major league pitchers:

“Storm clouds ahead! Take cover! Watch out for an early shower! The batters are knocking down the fences again! It’s raining home runs!

“The hurlers got an inkling of things to come at Ebbets Field yesterday when five of their offerings were hammered for home runs as the Brooklyn Dodgers won a 14-8 slugging match from the St. Louis Cardinals. Gil Hodges and pitcher Ben Wade homered for the Dodgers. Stan Musial hit two out of the park for the Cards and Larry Miggins hit one.”

~ Joe Reichler, Sports Writer, Associated Press, Corpus Christi Times, Saturday, May 14, 1952, Page 21.
“And Larry Miggins hits one?”

Oh, really? …. Larry Miggins hits one? …. Is that the best you can do for a guy’s first home run in the big leagues, Joe Reichler?

Maybe so. If you take into account that Larry Miggins hit his second and only other big league homer just a few days later against future Hall of Famer Warren Spahn of the Boston Braves, you may have already reported all the world needs to know about baseball player Miggins in your job of daily describing in a fairly consistent pattern  the wins and losses of a big league baseball season.

They don’t call the job ‘beat writer’  for nothing.

It’s just that this first homer carried with it the irony of an old friendship dream and wish that made it a lot different from most. This first home run by Larry Miggins, as called by future Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully, had a most unusual date with destiny. And remember too, and the always popping up irony wrinkle in baseball history would have nothing to do with the oatmeal treatment of this seemingly ordinary story of a young MLB prospect nailing one of the few home runs he would hit in pursuit of a big league career. Larry Miggins already had been touched by history in 1946 as one of the men who would play in Jackie Robinson’s first game in organized baseball for the Montreal Royals. He would play that game as the third baseman for the opposing home cub, the Jersey City Giants.

“I always say that I helped Jackie get off to a good start in his first game,” Miggins still likes to claim. “Because I played so deep that day, Robinson was able to beat out a couple of bunt singles on me. And, of course, there’s also that picture of Jackie sliding under the throw to me on a steal of third base at Jersey City.”

The first Miggins home run day at Ebbets Field was even more special because of the personal connection between Larry Miggins and Vin Scully. Both New York City boys had attended high school at Fordham Prep, where they played baseball on the wings of special personal dreams. If memory serves, Scully was a year ahead of Miggins in class, but that’s really immaterial to this story.. They were  friends – and both played baseball with slightly different baseball future dreams about the game.

Vin Scully tells the story best – and I couldn’t think of a more glorious Easter weekend tale about heart-inspired dreams, the power of faith, ability, and effort working together, and the resurrection of spiritual deliverance through baseball.

In the blocked section that follows, here’s how the wonderful researcher and writer Curt Smith handled this story about Vin Scully  as it was told in “Pull Up a Chair: The Vin Scully Story” by Curt Smith,  Potomac Books (2009), Page 17. Smith starts where all true Vin Scully stories begin – with the reader’s mind in a listening mode, sitting with Vin, listening to him  describe his old pal and baseball teammate Larry Miggins:

________________________________________

Bronx born Larry Miggins was a “tall, rangy kid,” said Scully, “our best athlete,” and already pining for the bigs.

In 2000 Vin told Fordham University’s commencement how they had spoken in a less mock-suspense than will-o’-the-wisp way. “I want to be a major-league baseball player,” Miggins whispered in a Prep Assembly. “I wonder what the odds against that would be?”

“I want to be a major-league broadcaster,”  Scully countered in the back row of the auditorium. “Whoa, I wonder what the odds against that would be?”

Vin mused “about the odds if we both make it.” Then: “I wonder what the odds would be if I were broadcasting a game in which you played?”

Making the 1948 Cardinals, Miggins resurfaced in 1952. That May 13, he batted in the fourth inning at Brooklyn: “one of the two [usually third and seventh] I did each game,” said Scully. Suddenly, “I’m sitting there, overwhelmed that this is happening.”

Preacher Roe threw a fastball: “a cantaloupe,” said Miggins, clearing the wall. Stunned, Vin called his pal’s first of two big-league homers “as close to breaking down doing a baseball game or any other sports event I have ever experienced” – still towering, like the time.

~ Curt Smith, “Pull Up a Chair: The Vin Scully Story, (2009), Potomac, Page 17.

________________________________________

Even Scully and Miggins may not have dreamed that their off-the charts wish would go so far as to include a Miggins fist big league homer, but it did. The improbability of that happening too would have taken us to a whole other universe of statistical improbability.

The Rest of the Story

Shortly after I posted this column earlier this morning, I received this short reminder note from fabled 27K game pitcher Ron Necciai about the Scully-Miggins phenomenon. It simply read: “strange, same day as my only 27K game. Keep em coming. – Ron” My e-mail reply to the great guy I’ve learned Ron Necciai to be went simply like this – and it completes the rest of the story as far as I can take it:

E-Mail Reply from Bill McCurdy to Ron Necciai

Ron -

Those two things happening on the same day simply amplify the possibility that God was working overtime on May 13, 1952.

When we talked the other day, you mentioned the million dollar dividend you’ve been paid on your small change personal investment as a player. I understand what you mean, but please allow me to disagree with you on the value of your investment. On May 13, 1952, you, like Scully and Miggins on the same day, went out there and did something that no one else had ever done before or since: you struck out 27 batters in one nine inning game that also “just happened” to end up as a no-hitter. Ron, that was no small thing – not to the millions of us slightly younger guys across America who were out there busting our butts to also find a place in baseball.

As a 14-year old, your example taught me to believe in the possible – in great and good outcome terms. In spite of that one first time that I was pulled into a game and struck out the side on nine pitches, I never developed into a great pitcher – not even a good one – but I will never forget how that one inning felt. And I also know that the same attitude has followed me into everything else I’ve tried to do since that time. And you must accept part of the credit for anything worthwhile I’ve ever done. Your example taught me to believe in myself – and all the great and good things that baseball and life both have to offer.

And please take these words as my humble $5.00 investment in your personal baseball dividend fund. You deserve that Lincoln and more.

 … and a very Happy Easter to you and yours!

Regards, Bill

Happy Easter, Everybody!

Thank you Curt Smith, Vin Sculy, Larry Miggins and Ron Necciai. In all its now even expanded splendor as a magical day in baseball, it’s even more fitting as a great story for the Easter Weekend.

 

 

 

.

 

 

Aaron’s 1st HR: 04-23-1954

April 18, 2014
Young Hank Aarom

Young Hank Aarom

Hank Aaron broke into the big leagues as a right fielder for the Milwaukee Braves on April 13, 1954 in a road game against the Cincinnati Reds. Ten days later, playing in his ?th major league game at St. Louis, Aaron hit his first of 755 career home runs against right-handed Cardinals starter Vic Raschi. It was a solo shot by Aaron, but it  allowed the Braves to finish the 9th in a 4-4 tie with a chance to play for victory in extra innings. Milwaukee would go on from there to take a 7-5 win over the Cards at Busch Stadium I, the place that was better known as Sportsman’s Park prior to 1953, in 14 innings..

Like a lot of major events that find their start in the low light of public expectation and attention. the first mile in Hank Aaron’s assault on the 714 career home runs record of Babe Ruth began well below the level of public attention. In fact, by the time that writers and fans awakened to the steady, undramatic, but certain-as-sunshine pattern in which Aaron hit home runs, Hammerin’ Hank was well on Ruth’s heels and catching up with him in big bite seasonal gulps..

This Associated Press coverage story of Aaron’s first home run is typical of his whole camouflaged career. It was one which actually began with the thin, athletic Henry Aaron starting out with a physical build that hardly promoted any idea of him as the second coming of the Sultan of Swat. In fact another rookie named Charley White also got his first MLB homer in this same game, a stroke that was doubly celebrated as his first big league hit. Watch the difference in coverage here  for White over Aaron in their shared debut as big league home run hitters.

Here’s how The Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune quietly reported Aaron’s first big league homer:

________________________________________

BRAVES DEFEAT CARDINALS IN 14-INNING GAME, 7-5

ST. LOUIS (AP) – The Milwaukee Braves did it the hard way Friday night in their first  invasion of Busch Stadium this year.

They defeated the St. Louis Cardinals, 7-5, in 14 innings – the longest game of the infant major league baseball season. The contest wound up well past midnight, four hours and two minutes after it started.

Jim Pendleton settled the marathon outing when he slammed a pinch hit single with the bases loaded in the 14th.Solly Hemus kicked what easily would have been a double play grounder, setting up a pair of runs.

Andy Pafko had opened up the inning with a single and Hank Aaron did likewise. Johnny Logan reached base on Hemus’ error.

Tie Game in Ninth

The Braves tied the score in the ninth against Vic Raschi on Jack Dittmer’s two-out run-scoring single.

They moved momentarily ahead in the 13th on Charley White’s homer – his first major league hit – and then watched St. Louis tie in its half when (left fielder) Eddie Mathews fell down in left field and Wally Moon’s hit skipped past him for a triple.

Moon, a rookie and successor to Enos Slaughter in the Cardinals outfield, collected five of Cardinals nine hits off Gene Conley, Ernie Johnson, winner Dave Jolly, and Ray Crone.

Braves who slammed homers were Aaron, Logan, and White. Altogether the Braves hit 16 blows off Raschi, Al Brazle, loser Ellis Deal, Joe Presko, and Royce Lint.

Cardinals Move Ahead

Solid singles by Danny O’Connell and (Eddie) Mathews got the game underway. After (Joe) Adcock went out, (Andy) Pafko singled to deep short, filling the bases and (Hank) Aaron’s hit to almost the same place sent O’Connell home.

The Cardinals scored two runs in their half of the first inning and stayed ahead of the Braves until the ninth inning when the Milwaukeeans worked the game (into) the tie that sent it into extra innings.

Meanwhile, (Milwaukee) manager Charlie Grimm announced that when Billy Bruton recovers sufficiently from a virus infection and returns to the lineup, Aaron will go back to the bench..

Grimm said Mathews will stay in left field, with Bruto in center and Pafko in right.

Dittmer will contiune playing at second with O’Connell staying at third. The Braves remain in St. Louis tonight, again playing the Cards under the lights.

 

~ Associated Press, Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, Saturday, April 24, 1954, Page 6.

________________________________________

Baseball Almanac Box ScoresMilwaukee Braves 7, St. Louis Cardinals 5
Milwaukee Braves ab   r   h rbi
Dittmer 2b 8 0 1 1
O’Connell 3b 7 1 4 0
Mathews lf 5 0 1 0
Adcock 1b 4 0 0 0
Pafko cf 6 1 2 0
Aaron rf 7 2 3 2
Logan ss 7 1 1 1
Crandall c 4 0 1 0
  Sisti pr 0 1 0 0
  Jolly p 2 0 0 0
  Pendleton ph 1 0 1 2
  Crone p 0 0 0 0
Conley p 2 0 1 0
  Metkovich ph 1 0 0 0
  Johnson p 0 0 0 0
  White ph,c 4 1 1 1
Totals 58 7 16 7
St. Louis Cardinals ab   r   h rbi
Repulski lf 6 0 0 0
Moon cf 5 2 5 0
Schoendienst 2b 5 1 0 1
Musial rf 4 1 1 1
Jablonski 3b 5 1 1 2
Alston 1b 5 0 1 0
Yvars c 3 0 0 0
  Frazier ph 1 0 0 0
  Rice c 2 0 1 0
  Haddix pr 0 0 0 0
Grammas ss 3 0 0 0
  Hemus ph,ss 1 0 0 0
Raschi p 3 0 0 0
  Burgess ph 1 0 0 0
  Brazle p 0 0 0 0
  Bilko ph 1 0 0 0
  Deal p 0 0 0 0
  Presko p 0 0 0 0
  Lint p 0 0 0 0
  Schofield ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 46 5 9 4
Milwaukee 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 7 16 1
St. Louis 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 9 2
  Milwaukee Braves IP H R ER BB SO
Conley 6.0 4 4 3 5 3
  Johnson 2.0 1 0 0 0 0
  Jolly  W(1-0) 5.0 3 1 1 2 1
  Crone  SV(1) 1.0 1 0 0 1 3
Totals
14.0
9
5
4
8
7
  St. Louis Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO
Raschi 9.0 10 4 4 1 4
  Brazle 3.0 1 0 0 3 2
  Deal  L(0-1) 1.1 4 3 3 0 0
  Presko 0.0 1 0 0 0 0
  Lint 0.2 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
14.0
16
7
7
4
7

E–Aaron (1), Hemus 2 (2).  DP–Milwaukee 3. Adcock-Logan, Conley-Logan-Adcock, O’Connell-Dittmer-Adcock.  2B–Milwaukee Crandall (1).  3B–St. Louis Moon (2,off Jolly).  HR–Milwaukee Aaron (1,6th inning off Raschi 0 on); Logan (3,4th inning off Raschi 0 on); White (1,13th inning off Deal 0 on)., St. Louis Jablonski (2,3rd inning off Conley 1 on 2 out).  SH–Mathews (1); Adcock (1)..  Team LOB–14.  SF–Schoendienst (2,off Jolly).  IBB–Alston (1,by Conley); Musial (1,by Conley); Hemus (1,by Jolly).  Team–8.  SB–Moon (1); Alston (2); Moon (1,2nd base off Johnson/Crandall); Alston (2,2nd base off Jolly/White).  U-HP–Al Barlick, 1B–Lon Warneke, 2B–Augie Donatelli, 3B–Lee Ballanfant.  T–4:02.  A–14,577.

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Fun with Baseball Almanac by Mike McCroskey

April 17, 2014

Question: When is a reader’s comment on a Pecan Park Eagle column pretty much of a column unto itself?

Answer: When it’s a 783-word comment by a reader like Mike McCroskey, a fellow who also makes pretty much everything he does both educational and/or entertaining. plus, the man is tight and loyal to family,  friends, and the great game of baseball, a member of SABR, a successful businessman, an Astros season ticket-holder, and a fun guy being around too – if you don’t mind someone taking a fairly constant humorous jab to your psychological ribs – which I don’t. Mike’s the best.

Mike used the Baseball Almanac box score that came with the piece I wrote yesterday on Babe Ruth’s first home run of the 1927 season and used is as a stream for panning gold from the halls of baseball history. It was so much fun that we simply couldn’t leave it buried as a comment that may have been too long for a lot of folks to even read in that small type they give us. The format is fine in our “comments” section for short statements, but way too small for dissertations or, as Mike suggests, the digressions of an ADD suffering researcher.

Here it is, for what it is, a well-written and entertaining column by Mike McCroskey. The Pecan Park Eagle has even repeated the same Baseball Almanac box score so that each of you shall be free to easily retrace Mike’s steps on the way to each one of those nearly 800 words, if you so choose.

Thanks, Mike. The Pecan Park Eagle appreciates what you’ve done here.

Fun with Baseball Almanac

By Mike McCroskey, Guest Columnist

Mike McCroskey Guest Columnist

Mike McCroskey
Guest Columnist

Aahh, the blessings of ADD! Bill, i enjoyed this column and got captivated, not by the Yankee, but by the Philadelphia box score. Thanks to your accompanying links I was able to research some of the players in the lineup.

Not remembering that Ty Cobb played for anyone other than Detroit, I clicked on Cobb, batting third ahead of future HOF’er Al Simmons and found out that it was indeed the Georgia Peach, finishing out his 24 year career with 2 seasons for the A’s. The “over-the-hill,” 40 year old Cobb “only managed” a .357 batting average for the ’27 season with 100+ RBI. He hit .323 the next year before retiring.

I then checked the lead-off hitter, who was none other than 40 year old, future HOF’er Eddie Collins.

I then saw that a guy named Foxx went in as a late inning replacement for the catcher Perkins. Turns out it was a 19 year old youngster named Jimmy Foxx, already beginning the 3rd year of his HOF career. Primarily a first baseman, this was one of only 109 appearances at catcher of his 2188 game career. Looking like quite a line up the A’s fielded that game.

My favorite read, though, was Dykes. He appeared as a pinch hitter, doubling for the starting pitcher Ehmke. Jimmy Dykes was an All Star infielder several times in his career, in fact he started at 3rd base in the first All Star game ever in 1933. He was, also, a player manager, primarily with the White Sox in the 30′ and early 40′s. He was the first man to spend over 20 years as both a player and a manager. I think he is still the only manager to be traded for another manager. This happened about 1961 when Trader Frank Lane of Cleveland, swapped his manager, Joe Gordon, straight up to Detroit for Dykes. Dykes was the first manager to win over 1,000 games without ever making the playoffs. Gene Mauch may have tied him. However, sabermetric calculations now show that his teams performed at a much higher level than their talent would project. So he was a good manager. He was, also, the first manager for the Baltimore Orioles after your beloved Browns left St Louis.

With the White Sox he had a first baseman named Zeke Bonura who was know neither for his fielding nor his intellect. The man could not remember signs. There was a story where one time Dykes wanted Bonura to bunt and he missed the signed. So Dykes just started hollering, “Bunt, bunt you Meathead, B-U-N-T, bunt!” But he still got no bunt from Bonura. Later when Zeke was traded to the Senators in 1938, Dykes didn’t even bother to change his signs because he figured Bonura couldn’t remember them anyway.

Later, in a game against the Senators. Bonura makes it to 3rd base. Dykes is in the dugout and swatting at a mosquito. Bonura somehow remembers that a swat is Dykes’ sign for a steal; so on the next pitch he breaks for home. As a first baseman, I am guessing that he was not a speedster, he had only 19 stolen bases for his career, but he somehow dislodges the ball from the catcher and is safe, scoring a run against Dykes! In an after the game interview Bonura is said to have confessed, “I remembered the sign for a steal, I just forgot that Dykes wasn’t my manager anymore!”

One last interesting story about Dykes, especially given one of our SABR meeting topics this past Monday: In 1939, the White Sox played an exhibition in Pasadena, California against a team called the Pasadena Sox. They had a 19 year old, black shortstop who made several dazzling plays and impressed with the bat, also.

Dykes was quoted at the time as saying “If that kid where white, I would sign him right now.”

Later, in 1942, he did give this phenom, along with another black youngster named Nate Moreland, an opportunity to try out for the White Sox. At the conclusion of the tryout, neither player got an offer, and there was speculation if the tryouts were really legitimate or not, as there had been no real talk at this time amongst the major leagues about integration. So maybe, it was just a publicity stunt to deflect racial criticisms. At any rate, nothing changed. Would this have changed baseball history had an offer been made? The young phenom’s name? Jackie Robinson!

Curiously enough, when asked to comment on another prominent black ballplayer in 1961, Dykes was quoted as saying, “Without Ernie Banks, the Cubs would finish in Albuquerque.”

Thanks again, Bill. Really enjoyed today’s column.

You should have enjoyed it, Mr. McCroskey. You wrote it.

Baseball Almanac Box Score:

Philadelphia Athletics 3, New York Yankees 6

Philadelphia Athletics ab   r   h rbi
Collins 2b 4 0 0 0
Lamar lf 4 0 0 0
Cobb rf 4 0 1 0
Simmons cf 4 1 2 0
Hale 3b 2 0 0 0
Poole 1b 2 0 1 1
Perkins c 3 0 1 0
  French pr 0 1 0 0
  Foxx c 1 0 0 0
Boley ss 2 1 1 0
Ehmke p 2 0 0 0
  Dykes ph 1 0 1 2
  Pate p 0 0 0 0
  Walberg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 3 7 3
New York Yankees ab   r   h rbi
Combs cf 4 1 2 0
Koenig ss 5 0 2 1
Ruth rf 4 2 2 1
Gehrig 1b 1 1 0 0
Meusel lf 4 0 2 0
Lazzeri 2b 4 0 1 2
Gazella 3b 3 2 2 0
Collins c 3 0 1 1
Pennock p 4 0 0 1
Totals 32 6 12 6
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 7 2
New York 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 x 6 12 0
  Philadelphia Athletics IP H R ER BB SO
Ehmke  L(0-1) 6.0 9 4 4 3 1
  Pate 0.0 1 2 1 2 0
  Walberg 2.0 2 0 0 1 3
Totals
8.0
12
6
5
6
4
  New York Yankees IP H R ER BB SO
Pennock  W(1-0) 9.0 7 3 3 2 0
Totals
9.0
7
3
3
2
0

E–Perkins (1), Pate (1).  DP–New York 1. Koenig-Lazzeri-Gehrig.  2B–Philadelphia Simmons (3); Dykes (2), New York Koenig (1); Collins (2).  3B–New York Gazella 2 (2).  HR–New York Ruth (1,1st inning off Ehmke 0 on 2 out).  SH–Hale 2 (3); Poole (1); Gehrig 2 (3); Collins (1).  Team LOB–4.  Team–11.  SB–Combs (1).  CS–Koenig (1).  U–Bill McGowan, Billy Evans, George Hildebrand.  T–2:27.  A–16,000.

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Ruth’s 1st Homer of 1927

April 16, 2014
Babe Ruth Who Else?

Babe Ruth
Who Else?

April 15, 1927. It happened in the fourth game of the season for the New York Yankees. With two outs and nobody on base in the bottom of the first inning, Babe Ruth caught up with a pitch from the tall right-handed Howard Ehmke of the Philadelphia Athletics and drove it high, far, and fast into the right field bleachers for his first home run of the 1927 season. Of course, nobody knew for sure what was in store for the HR record this early in that fabled season, but it would not later land either as a shock or great surprise. Babe Ruth already had readjusted the expectations of the baseball world prior to even the greatest season of New York’s fabled Murderers’ Row.

Here’s how one Associated Press story covered the Yankees’ 6-3 win over Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics on April 15, 1927:

________________________________________

RUTH SMASHES OUT HOME RUN

Yesterday’s hero: Babe Ruth, who turned to his familiar home run role with a long drive into the right field bleachers in the first inning and started the New York Yankees off to their third straight victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. The score was 6 to 3.

There was nothing spectacular about Ruth’s home run, the bases were empty when it was made, and later developments proved it was not needed for the Yankees to win, but home runs are what the Bambino is paid for and in starting his 1927 string he brought satisfaction to the thousands who believe in his greatness.

The Yankees made one run (in) each of the first four innings and two in the seventh while Herb Pennock was holding the A’s to seven hits, several which were bunched in the seventh inning to give the Athletics their three runs.

Sidebar Article Note: Babe Ruth, the most noted victim of an appetite, consumed too many hot dogs during the opening game (of this season-opening series against the A’s) and had to retire with a stomach ache, but Ben Paschal walked up to the bat (in Ruth’s place) and smacked out a single, whereas the Babe hadn’t even smelled one.

~ Uncredited Writer, Wire Release Story, Elyria (Ohio) Chronicle Telegram, April 16, 1927, Page 10.

The uncredited writer of this game account and sidebar comment doesn’t exactly sound like a Ruth fan or the type of man who would like to risk a chance encounter with The Sultan of Swat in a New York bar or speakeasy under the onus of having to take clear responsibility for what he wrote about players in the national media.

________________________________________

Baseball Almanac Box Scores:Philadelphia Athletics 3, New York Yankees 6
Philadelphia Athletics ab   r   h rbi
Collins 2b 4 0 0 0
Lamar lf 4 0 0 0
Cobb rf 4 0 1 0
Simmons cf 4 1 2 0
Hale 3b 2 0 0 0
Poole 1b 2 0 1 1
Perkins c 3 0 1 0
  French pr 0 1 0 0
  Foxx c 1 0 0 0
Boley ss 2 1 1 0
Ehmke p 2 0 0 0
  Dykes ph 1 0 1 2
  Pate p 0 0 0 0
  Walberg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 3 7 3
New York Yankees ab   r   h rbi
Combs cf 4 1 2 0
Koenig ss 5 0 2 1
Ruth rf 4 2 2 1
Gehrig 1b 1 1 0 0
Meusel lf 4 0 2 0
Lazzeri 2b 4 0 1 2
Gazella 3b 3 2 2 0
Collins c 3 0 1 1
Pennock p 4 0 0 1
Totals 32 6 12 6
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 7 2
New York 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 x 6 12 0
  Philadelphia Athletics IP H R ER BB SO
Ehmke  L(0-1) 6.0 9 4 4 3 1
  Pate 0.0 1 2 1 2 0
  Walberg 2.0 2 0 0 1 3
Totals
8.0
12
6
5
6
4
  New York Yankees IP H R ER BB SO
Pennock  W(1-0) 9.0 7 3 3 2 0
Totals
9.0
7
3
3
2
0

E–Perkins (1), Pate (1).  DP–New York 1. Koenig-Lazzeri-Gehrig.  2B–Philadelphia Simmons (3); Dykes (2), New York Koenig (1); Collins (2).  3B–New York Gazella 2 (2).  HR–New York Ruth (1,1st inning off Ehmke 0 on 2 out).  SH–Hale 2 (3); Poole (1); Gehrig 2 (3); Collins (1).  Team LOB–4.  Team–11.  SB–Combs (1).  CS–Koenig (1).  U–Bill McGowan, Billy Evans, George Hildebrand.  T–2:27.  A–16,000.

Baseball Almanac Box Score | Printer Friendly Box Scores

The Spirit of SABR: Our April 2014 Meeting

April 15, 2014
Larry and Kathleen Miggins with son Larry Joe and wife Sherl Miggins at a 2011 Houston Babies game.

Larry and Kathleen Miggins with son Larry Joe and wife Sherl Miggins at a 2011 Houston Babies game.

Last Night’s April SABR Meeting (with a healthy dose of Miggins reflections added for seasoning.

The Larry Dierker Chapter of SABR should count their lucky stars for the presence of such historical stars as Marie “Red” Mahoney, age 90 in 2014, Houston’s original member of the National Girls Professional Baseball League of the 1940s and Larry Miggins, age 9 in 1914, a former St. Louis Cardinal and one the last surviving Houston Buffs. Both are members of the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame and members in good standing of the Society for American Baseball Research. And both served as extremely valuable first person sources in our chapter research for the 368-page hard cover history book that finally will  be coming out in the next 10-14 days from Bright Sky Press, “Houston Baseball: The Early Years, 1861-1961.”

If you care to order the book at its pre-release price of $39.95, you may still do so at http://www.houstonbaseball.org/

But back to my dear friend, Mr. Miggins, who rides with me to each of our downtown Houston monthly SABR meetings. It’s simple as that, but something I never figured on as a kid, when the 1951 Houston Buffs were my early life heroes and the tandem slugging of first baseman Jerry Witte and left fielder Larry Miggins were tearing the cover off the ball. Witte had 38 HR for the ’51 Texas League champs and Miggins had 28.

“I should have had 29, but a very confused and confusing umpire took one away from me,” Miggins protested to me on the way to SABR last night. “I hit one down the left line for a home run and had circled the bases and even sat down in the dugout, when I was suddenly called back to the plate to keep hitting.”

“What do you mean, ‘keep hitting’, I protested,” Miggins added. “I just got the signal for a homer.”

“Well, it wasn’t fair,” the umpire stated. “I decided it was foul.”

“What? What?” I said in my rarely raised voice. “I’ll tell you what’s not fair. – You’re not fair.”

“I didn’t win the argument, but I didn’t get thrown out,” Miggins added. “Just more evidence that I was cheated out of a home run by an umpire with a guilty conscience. A clear-headed umpire would have ejected me for my protests. – I’ve never forgotten it.”

As most of our SABR chapter meeting people know, Larry Miggins played third base for Jersey City in 1946 when Jackie Robinson made his professional debut for Montreal. Miggins takes tongue-in-cheek credit for two of Robinson’s bunt singles down the third base line on his deep-playing self that day.

Miggins is also the guy who one spring in the 1940s at the University of Pittsburgh played catch and took infield grounders from volunteer coach Honus Wagner and also the high school classmate of iconic broadcaster Vin Scully who came around to fulfill a boyhood prophecy that he (Scully) would one day be broadcasting in the big leagues when Larry came to bat and hit his first major league home run. And so it happened that way in 1948 when Larry Miggins came to bat at Ebbets Field for the Cardinals and hit his first MLB homer off Preacher Roe. Guess what? Vin Scully was the Dodger announcer who called the Miggins shot.

Then there was the famous “most honest player in baseball” story that floated out of Columbus in 1950, but we will save that one for another time. That one, and so many others, deserve their own chapters.

Larry and his lovely, funny Irish wife, Kathleen Miggins, recently celebrated their gazillionth wedding anniversary. They are the parents of 12 children and numerous grandchildren. And, as most of you know too, they were the parents too of another fine man who also played ball for our Houston Babies, the late, but always-still-with-us-in-spirit soul of goodness and happy times, the late Larry Joe Miggins.

Last night at SABR, Jim Kreuz led us on a CSI-level paper investigation of the Branch Rickey-inspired “Search for Silvio Garcia” of Cuba down in Mexico as the potential first black player in organized baseball. The effort never panned out as Rickey’s search person always seemed to arrive on the scene just in time to be told something like “Silvio left herre yesterday to go back into the military.” Dave Skelton of Waco and the Austin-based Rogers Hornsby Chapter delivered a dedicated presentation on “all the things I never knew” until he got into baseball research for player profiles and our own Tom Murrah gave the group a breathtaking picture of the sweeping scope his research took him into the history of high school and college ball for our Houston history book. Both presentations were well received. It was a full night traveling down trails we’ve never before tonight visited so totally as a meeting group.

Greg Lucas almost aced a 12 question (10/12), very detailed trivia quiz and chapter leader Bob Dorrill welcomed several new members as he and convention co-chair Marsha Franty brought us up to date on preparations for this summer’s national SABR Convention # 44 in Houston.

Based on the guesses of those picking Astro win totals for 2014, most people see the Astros as beating the 100-loss per season plague, but still playing well below .500 ball at this stage in the rebuilding process.

Mr. Larry Miggins

Mr. Larry Miggins

After the meeting, I listened again as Mr. Miggins told this story to guest speaker Dave Skelton:

Two citizens of the world were having a conversation about language. One was from Mexico. The other man was from Ireland.

Here’s how it went:

Citizen of Mexico: “Manana is the Spanish word we use for things we plan to do in the future. And by ‘future’, I don’t necessarily mean things we shall do tomorrow. They may be  things we don’t get around to doing until next week, or next month, or next year, or maybe even five-ten years from now.”

Citizen of Ireland: “Fascinating!”

Citizen of Mexico: “Do you have a Gaelic word that expresses the same ideas about future action as our Spanish ‘manana’ does, and so well?”

Citizen of Ireland: “I’m afraid we don’t have a Gaelic word that attaches that much urgency to the notion of future action.”

 

 

Babies Win Katy DH in Sealy, 15-9, 10-2.

April 13, 2014

 

"Cows and Bulls and Blue Bonnets - are taking me back - to the land that I love! ~ Cows and Bulls and Blue Bonnets - are taking me back - to South Texas!" -  (C) Bill McCurdy, 1958.

“Cows and Bulls and Blue Bonnets – are taking me back – to the land that I love! ~ Cows and Bulls and Blue Bonnets – are taking me back – to South Texas!” – (C) Bill McCurdy, 1958.

The bluebonnet trail to Sealy yesterday didn’t exactly play out as this photo suggests, but it may have done so for somebody else at some point along the road. We never give up on the complete dream of a little baseball paradise unfolding as it always does from the back burners of our fertile minds and 24’7 devotion to the spirit of the game that is baseball – and especially vintage baseball. Yesterday the Houston Babies and the Katy Combine were guest participants in the Sealy, Texas Spring Festival at the a park near the city’s downtown area on a bright and shiny and windy spring day.

Yesterday, Saturday, March 12, 2014, it was the Babies’ turn to bring youth and vitality to the field, just as the Katy Combine had done unto the Babies only last month at the George Rance near Sugar Land with a sweep of their own. This time, our Babies prevailed, 15-9 and 10-2, behind the steady pitching of Bob Blair in Game One and the four-inning shortened game by “The Buffalo”, Larry Hajduk.

Funny thing is, it wasn’t youth that lead all batters today. The Old Carolinian, Phil Holland, lead all batters in both games by banging out 7 hits in the DH. Here’s a brief pictorial on how Babies fared at the plate in both games:

Phil Holland: 7 for 9 4 Runs, .778 BA

Phil Holland: 7 for 9
4 Runs, .778 BA

Alex Hajduk, 6 for 8 4 Runs, .750 BA

Alex Hajduk, 6 for 8
4 Runs, .750 BA

Larry Hajduk: 5 for 7 2 Runs, .714 BA

Larry Hajduk: 5 for 7
2 Runs, .714 BA

Austin Price: 5 for 7 2 Runs .714

Austin Price: 5 for 7
2 Runs .714

Eric Blair: 5 for 8 3 Runs ..625 BA

Eric Blair: 5 for 8
3 Runs ..625 BA

Mike & Meghan McCroskey 2 for 3 1 Run .667 BA

Mike & Meghan McCroskey
2 for 3
1 Run .667 BA

Kyle Burns: 3 for 5 2 Runs, .600 BA

Kyle Burns: 3 for 5
2 Runs, .600 BA

Ira Liebman, 3 for 5 2 Runs, .600 BA

Ira Liebman, 3 for 5
2 Runs, .600 BA

Bob Blair & Family Bob: 1 for 2 1 Run, .500 BA

Bob Blair & Family
Bob: 1 for 2
1 Run, .500 BA

Robby Martin, 3 for 7 2 runs, .600 BA

Robby Martin, 3 for 7
2 runs, .429 BA

Alex Stubbs, 3 for 7 2 Runs, .429 BA

Alex Stubbs, 3 for 7
2 Runs, .429 BA

On the day, with copious extra base hits, but no homers, the Houston Babies team batting average for both games .632. They also scored 25 runs on the day and made many sparkling lays on the field.

The Babies welcome back the talented Eric Blair to their lineup and also send a hearty handshake newcomer Alex Stubbs for the fine game he played.

We also never cease to be amazed by the way our official radio game broadcaster Ira Liebman handles his double duty as a Babies player, It’s especially interesting to watch and listen close to Ira’s broadcast as he calls those plays he’s also simultaneously making on the field. Heres an example of Ira called the shoe string catch he made in right field in the 3rd inning of Game One:

“The left batter swings …. and here’s a low sinnking liner coming at me in shallow right. …. Run, Ira, ,,, Run! …. I need to dive … I’m diving … I’m skidding across the grass like a plane landing with no wheels. … My chin is bumping the ground. I’m also eating grass ,,, this is no good … I can’t see the ball… When am I going to stop slidding … THUMP!!! …. WAIT A MINUTE, FOLKS! … I just caught the ball for a one-bounce out three. … Man! … Am I ever going to get those fist and chest bump congrats from the rest of the other Babies for this one! … Side retired, fans. … I’ll interview this marvelous flelder after the game too … if I can catch up with him.” – Ira Liebman, RF, Play-By Play Guy, Houston Babies.

The Second Baptist Elder Ladies Harmonic Church Choir, Sealy, Texas.

The Second Baptist Elder Ladies Harmonic Church Choir, Sealy, Texas.

Our Luncheon Concert. As we feasted on beef and chicken fajitas, and hot dogs, on the fair’s gathering place lawn, we were entertained by Sealy’s 2nd Baptist Elder Ladies Harmonic Church Choir, starting with Our National Anthem. It was our first dilemma of the day. We had been holding our food down from the wind fairly well to that point, but now we needed to stand, remove our ball caps, and hold our hand and caps over our hearts. I wasn’t sure at first how that was going to work, but there was no struggle with our choice.  It’s better to lose your fajitas than it is to lose your country.

So we stood. Let go of our food. And proudly sang with the choir.And there was an abatement of the winds all the way through that last phrase, the one that concludes with “and the home of the brave.”  The the winds returned. And we went back to pinning food down before we woofed it down. Victory and defeat both leave clubs with an appetite for either consecration or consolation.

The choir sang on, covering broad ground on songs that were popular during the Civil War, religious numbers, like “How Great Thou Art”, Turn of the Century diddies like “Wait Til the Sun Shines, Nellie”, and even embracing Cole Porter’s evergreen hit, “Anything Goes.”

After lunch the Babies and the Combine squared off in team egg tossing contedt.

After lunch the Babies and the Combine squared off in team egg tossing contest.

The Egg Tossing Contestfeatured a team competition between the Babies and the Combine. If you’ve seen one these events, the premise is simple. Each team forms a two line row of people who start throwing a fresh egg to their partner. If you break your egg, your two person team is out. All others back up about three yards from the first throw and try again. This cntinues until there are few teams now tossing from great distances. The Babies hung in there for quite a while, but the contest was finally won by Dave Flores and Clay Merritt of the Katy Combine.

Early in the Egg Tossing Contest, Babies Manager Bob Dorrill demonstrates his skills for safely receiving a flying fresh egg.

Early in the Egg Tossing Contest, Babies Manager Bob Dorrill demonstrates his skills for safely receiving a flying fresh egg.

Credit goes to where credit is due. – Congratulations to our brothers on the Katy Combine team for showing the world one delicate aspect of the egg farm business.

Nancy of the Sealy Group awards the Lollipos that went to the winners of the Egg Tossing Contest as Clay Meritt (L) hold the winning egg over her head and Dave Flores looks on in pleasure.

Nancy of the Sealy Group awards the Lollipops that went to the winners of the Egg Tossing Contest as Clay Merritt (L) holds the winning egg over her head and Dave Flores looks on in pleasure.

Seeing that photo makes me wonder if the boys remember that Munchkin song from “The Wizard of Oz”, the one the two Munchkins proclaimed in song to new arrival Dorothy Gale of Kansas: “We represent – The Lollipop Guild, The Lollipop Guild, The Lollipop Guild.  We represent – The Lollipop Guild – and we wish to welcome you to Munchkin Land.”

It was another great outing for vintage ball, but sadly, this one was clouded by an injury to the Combine’s left fielder Roy Frankum in Game One. The Babies and the Pecan Park Eagle Press send out their prayers and most positive thoughts too for Roy’s recovery. I saw it happen from our first base dugout and it wasn’t pretty. Roy seemed to make a somersaulting tumble as he tried to catch up with a fly ball. He was instantly stopped and writhing in great pain. The tumble had dislocated his shoulder and, as we later learned, broken a collar bone.

“Good Luck and Our Prayers and Best Wishes go out to you, Roy Frankum! The Houston Babies care about what happens to you and we hope you will be back on one of our shared fields of dreams at the earliest opportunity.

Try to remember too, Roy: Injuries and the setbacks of illness and aging are there for all of us, but they are wounds of the body, and are all limited and temporary, even if they seem to be in control for all time. They are not in control. With the right attitude and spirit, we adjust.

Our dreams, and the spirit that allows us to have those visions in the name of love, are the stuff of the soul – and these powerful forces will be with us forever. We correct our minds and heal from the physical limits that come down upon us. We still live for the homes of the soul, no matter what. And vintage baseball is one of those homes of the soul for some of us. It is the sand lot we thought for years we had lost when we grew up. Even those of us who can no longer play still heal from being around the game because it never stopped being a big part of who we are.

Travis Price, Houston Babies Player of the Game

Travis Price,
Houston Babies
Babies Player of the Day

The Houston Babies also wish to thank Travis Price for helping us field a great  team and mount a great effort today. Travis, your hitting and your fielding in yesterday’s doubleheader at the Sealy Spring Festival have led us as a team to pick you as our “Player of the Day.”

Keep up the good work. Grow up to be a good productive person. And make your parents proud.

And try to remember this truth too:. Defeat or disappointment are never failures. They are learning opportunities about what we need to do next time we face the same circumstances. The only real failure in life is the failure to learn from painful experience.

Thanks also to all the people of Sealy who brought their exhibits, music, quilting, bake off cakes and cookies, and still had time to stage a parade. And thanks to Santa Anna from the Texas History military reenactment for stopping off to watch a little vintage baseball on his flight from the Battle of San Jacinto.

And special thanks to Kristi Hajduk for serving as scorekeeper for both games. The Houston Babies and Katy Combine both appreciate the help.

To everyone else, have a nice whatever is  left of Sunday!

1935: Kid in Hospital Gets Signed Ruth Ball

April 12, 2014

 

Babe Ruth, 1935 The End of Days

Babe Ruth, 1935
The End of Days

By April 12, 1935, 40-year old Babe  Ruth was beginning his short-lived National League career with the Boston Braves after 21-seasons and 733 (714 regular season; 19 World Series) home runs in the American League. By this time, the Babe was telling people that 750 career home runs had always been his goal and that he hoped to accomplish that feat in 1935. As we now know, Ruth fell far short of that goal, hitting only 6 HR by the time age and his .188 batting average led him into retirement after his May 30, 1935 final MLB game appearance.

Babe only his 6 homers in 1935, and three of them came in a single game a few days earlier in Pittsburgh. Unfortunately, “The Babe” did not have a scriptwriter, as actor William Bendix who played him in the 1948 movie, “The Babe Ruth Story.” Otherwise, Ruth would have done what Bendix did – taken himself out of the famous Pittsburgh game for a pinch runner after a single got him to first in the 9th following his three earlier homers. And it would have been the rookie on th Boston bench that Babe would have requested as his replacement, picking the very kid who had earlier complained alous about Ruth being a washed-up has been. Oh yeah, and Bendix as Babe also through in a quick verbal salvo to complete the kid’s drenching in shame for those earlier critical remarks. “Take care of the game, Kid,” Bendix as Ruth said. “Take care of the game – and the game will take care of you.”

Many of the Ruth movie legends were based in fact, but were not quite as dramatic as the movie instance in which Ruth’s promise to a dying boy in St. Louis that he will hit a World Series home run for him and he should be listening for it from his bed at home over the radio. In the Bendix movie version, the dying kid looks just about gone when the home run is announced. Then the kid opens his eyes and breaks into a smile of gratitude. What I never understood is how the dying kid in St. Louis was brought back from the dead by a Ruth home run against the Cardinals in one of their World Series matches of 1926 or 1928. As a Cardinal fan, one would think that a Ruthian home run would have just about finished him off, even if it were promised.

At any rate, Here’s a poor quality newsprint photo that accompanied a true story about Ruth paying attention to a sick kid in the hospital:

________________________________________

Jefferson City Post Tribune April 12, 1935 Page 9

Jefferson City Post Tribune
April 12, 1935
Page 9

“A real tonic that brought a smile to the face of bed-ridden young Jay Boy Richelson was an autographed baseball received from Babe Ruth. Jay, recovering at a Camden. N.J. hospital after four operations, is shown holding the prized horsehide on which is inscribed: ‘To My Pal, Jay Boy Richelson. Get Well Quick. From Babe Ruth’.”

~ Jefferson City Post Tribune, April 12, 1935, Page 9.

________________________________________

Don’t Forget! The Houston Babies play vintage 1860′s baseball in Sealy today (See yesterday’s column in The Pecan Eagle.) We’d love to have your support, so come on out to watch us shine among the bluebonnets.

 

 

 

Come See The Babies in Sealy Tomorrow

April 11, 2014
The George Ranch near Sug Land is another popular Houston Babies game site.

The George Ranch near Sugar Land is another popular Houston Babies game site.

Come join us tomorrow, Saturday, April 12th, at the Sealy, Texas Spring Festival. The Houston Babies will be playing two 1860′s rules vintage baseball games against some other clubs, with out first part of the doubleheader starting at half past 10 o’clock in the morning. The second game will be played shortly after lunch.

The location of the games is the Santa Fe Museum Park at the corner of Silliman and East Main in Sealy. Be prepared for not only vintage games, but an egg toss, Civil War or Texas History military reenactments, and a parade thrown in to boot, plus a probable appearance by “Bonnie and Clyde.”

Alex, Larry, and Zach Hajduk are a big part of the Babies game.

Alex, Larry, and Zach Hajduk are a big part of the Babies game.

Sealy is a beautiful little Texas town, located an easy 50 mile drive west of downtown Houston out I-10 West, and a cool breeze run both going and returning on what they say is going to be an ideal Spring day for baseball fun and a celebration of life that’s hard to surpass in all its joy and down to earth simplicity.

 

Bob Dorrill Manager Houston Babies

Bob Dorrill
Manager
Houston Babies

There will also be plenty of good food and friendly people there too. The bluebonnets and other wild flowers should also be out so, give yourself a break for an eye-feast on one of our annual South Texas Spring Treats while you are en route.

As per usual, The Pecan Park Eagle will be there to cover the action. So. drop by and say hello. We won’t be hard to find.

Come on, Spring! ~ Come on, People! ~ And Go, Babies!

 

HUZZAH!

 

 

 

 

April 10th: A Taste of Baseball History

April 10, 2014
 "Don't worry. - Be happy." Baseball Commissioner Happy Chandler 1945-1951


“Don’t worry. – Be happy.”
Baseball Commissioner
Happy Chandler
1945-1951

April 10, 1947: United Press, Cincinnati: Commissioner A.X. (Happy) Chandler, in the most sweeping punitive action since the Black Sox Scandal of 1919, today suspended (Brooklyn) manager Leo Durocher for a year, banned New York (Yankees) coach Charley Dressen for thirty days, and fined each club $2,000 for “conduct detrimental to baseball.”

He also handed out a $4500 fine to Harold Parrott, road secretary of the Brooklyn club for “writing a deliberately derogatory column about others in baseball.”

(There are no rights to freedom of assembly or free speech in baseball.)

~ United Press, Cincinnati, Nevada State Journal, April 10, 1947, Page 14.

"1936 just might be the year the Cubs win their first World Series since 1908!"

“1936 just might be the year the Cubs win their first World Series since 1908!”

April 10, 1936: Chicago is a logical choice to repeat in the National League.

With the confidence that came with the 21 victories that swept them to the grand old rag last fall in the greatest finish in baseball history, the young Cubs should prove much too formidable for none too robust opposition.

The Bruins, including te veterans Charley Root, Charley Grimm, and Gabby Hartnett, averaging only 26 years of age. Paced by the fleet Augie Galan and the brilliant Lon Warneke, the Wrigley entry ought to finish there or thereabouts for the next several campaigns.

~ Harry Grayson, Sports Editor, NEA Service, Gastonia Daily Gazette, April 10, 1936, Page 6.

"I earn my dough! - By the way, it''s 1927 - and I'm about to have a much better  year than the President of the United States."

“I earn my dough! – By the way, it”s 1927 – and I’m about to have a much better year than the President of the United States.”

April 10, 1927: Billy Evans Says: Did the New York Yankees make a wise move when Babe Ruth was signed to a three-year contract calling for $70,000 per annum?

There seems to be considerable difference of opinion on the is point.

Babe Ruth requested a one-year contract for one-hundred thousand simoleons. He agreed to take $30,000 less (per year) on a three-year contract.

Babe Ruth is one player who earns every cent he receives for his services, regardless of the size of his contract. Therefore, he is entitled to just as much money as he can get.

~ Billy Evans, Wichita Daily Times, April 10, 1927, Page 11.

 

 

 

 


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